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  NATIONAL CLASSIFICATION COMMITTEE 
Density and Value Guidelines

 
Minimum Average Density
[pounds per cubic foot (pcf)]
see
note 1
Class
Maximum Average Value
[dollars per pound]
see
notes 2 and 3
50 pcf
50
$ 0.85
35 pcf
55
$ 1.68
30 pcf
60
$ 2.54
22.5 pcf
65
$ 4.22
15 pcf
70
$ 6.37
13.5 pcf
77.5
$ 8.49
12 pcf
85
$ 12.75
10.5 pcf
92.5
$ 16.98
9 pcf
100
$ 21.23
8 pcf
110
$ 23.36
7 pcf
125
$ 26.54
6 pcf
150
$ 31.87
5 pcf
175
$ 37.18
4 pcf
200
$ 42.49
3 pcf
250
$ 53.11
2 pcf
300
$ 63.72
1 pcf
400
$ 84.97
Less than 1 pcf
500
$ 106.22

According to the National Classification Committee:

Note 1). The density guidelines are used in the assignment of classes where average density is representative or reflective of the range of densities exhibited. Furthermore, the density/class relationships set forth in the guidelines presume that there are no unusual or significant stowability, handling or liability characteristics, which would call for giving those characteristics additional or different "weight" in determining the appropriate class.

Note 2). Unlike density, value per pound is not in and of itself a separate transportation characteristic. Pursuant to the decisions in Ex Parte No. MC-98 (Sub-No. 1), Investigation Into Motor Carrier Classification, value per pound is only one component of the liability characteristic. Accordingly, information relating to value per pound must be analyzed in conjunction with the other liability elements, i.e., susceptibility to theft, liability to damage, propensity to damage other freight, perishability, and propensity to spontaneous combustion or explosion. Where those other liability elements are found to present no substantial problems or concerns, value per pound is of less significance.

Note 3).  Consequently, the value guidelines cannot be viewed as forming a matrix with the density guidelines, where one is measured against the other to arrive at the appropriate class representing an "average" of the two factors. Rather, the value guidelines provide an indication of the upper value limits associated with the various classes, as determined using the density guidelines.

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